Used as another word for public art or community art, Plop art usually refers to art that has been made for outdoor viewing. These types include the large emblematic structures outside government offices or NGO buildings. The term actually refers to art that does not match its surroundings well enough. Plop art is usually seen as a work that stands out of place when compared to the rest of the surrounding environment. In 1969, the term was coined by James Wines and was a play on the term “pop art”. Since then, people have began using it in everyday conversation to refer to these gigantic structural objects they see all around them.

Example of Plop Art

Many conservative people actually liked the term because it suggested a negative meaning. They made it look as if plop art had something to do with ugliness or strangeness, because of the word “plop” which sounds like a random dropping of an object without any care or particular attention to where it would fall. Others who enjoy plop art, have been trying to reclaim the term for a positive meaning, suggesting that “plop art” refers to public, contemporary, environental sculptures that are on display for the whole community to experience. Plop art is a type of sculpture that usually entwines itself with architecture. Some public artists now try to blend their art with existing structures like buildings and houses to make the scenery seem like part of the artwork.

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