Archives for category: Art Movements

A native of Düsseldorf, Norbert Kricke is a fine example of abstract sculpture in the non-figurist sense. Abstract sculpture can be classified into several sub-categories, but mainly fall into two types; representational and non-representational. Despite his works being frequently described as non-reresentational abstract sculpture, Kricke’s various organic forms are inspired by the subject matter of water and nature. His pin-like metal wires are a popular twist to the standardized wire armature pieces one may see in many artist studios. Kricke’s famous sculpture, “Water Forest” lies outside of the Gelsenkirchen Opera House.

Kricke steel sculpture

Kricke has created several grand pieces for famous people and locales, but among his roster of projects, his fountain art sculptures in the University of Baghdad stand out as prime examples of his undying passion for the abstract arts. Throughout his lifetime, his works have circled around continents, being displayed at various galleries such as the Galerie Rothe in Frankfurt and the Neues Museum Weimar. The Daimler Chrysler Contemporary Museum in Berlin also carries a permanent collection of his.

Everyone is familiar with the surrealist Salvador Dali and his famous artworks, but not as many people know about his permanent exhibition in France called the Espace Dalí. The entire complex holds over three hundred original art pieces made by Dali himself. It’s located near the Place du Terte in Montmarte. Creations like the Space Elephant are housed in this museum along with several other Dalinian sculptures. Dali’s conquest for surrealism is a widespread conveyance of its curiosity through the different artistic media. He made use of everything from paperwork to painting to sculpture.

DEspace Dalí
Espace Dalí – Photography by Florian75018

Within the museum, there are many chambers for the various types of visitors. There are workshops for children to learn about art, as well as temporary exhibitions at specific halls. The two galleries that make up the museum are the Galerie Dali and the Galerie Montmarte. The later is for several contemporary artists’ exhibition usage. The Espace Dalí is a wonderful place to visit for art enthusiasts, historians, professors, students and even families. It showcases the biggest group of artworks made by the master and is open to visitors young and old.

 

The term Found Art was coined by the famous artist Marcel Duchamp. It referred to art whose subject composition was that of everyday objects who retained their form but were changed just a bit. These objects were among the things that were not usually considered to be classified as art or art media. Other names for Found Art are Readymade Art or Trash Art. The purpose behind the invention of found art is to challenge the notions of what constitute fine art in the first place. Just because an everyday object has a routinized or boring purpose doe not mean that it cannot be seen as art in one way or another. Every artwork made and categorized as Found Art must have an input though from the artist- such as a narration or explanation to clarify its meaning. The object becomes such art because of the artist’s direct designation of the object as art, therefore he or she must defend the idea behind it.

found art
Sculpture by Marcel Duchamp – Photography by Alfred Stieglitz

Found Art quickly spread after the time of Duchamp and made its way into popular society. Dadaism quickly sprung from it and several artists such as Man Ray and Francis Picabia used it in combination with traditional art as well. Its roots can be traced to several more artists in history such as famous surrealists like André Breton and historical geniuses like Pablo Picasso.

Earlier, we mentioned that Trash art or junk art is another name for found art. This is because many people in the modern world have attributed the two to be one and the same (though this was not true during the earlier times.) Trash art is actually a sub-genre and is usually made up of assemblage sculptor who make use of discarded materials like old computers and microwave ovens. This type of contemporary art is a more modern way of looking at the journey of Found Art into the present time.