Archives for posts with tag: Contemporary Art

A native of Düsseldorf, Norbert Kricke is a fine example of abstract sculpture in the non-figurist sense. Abstract sculpture can be classified into several sub-categories, but mainly fall into two types; representational and non-representational. Despite his works being frequently described as non-reresentational abstract sculpture, Kricke’s various organic forms are inspired by the subject matter of water and nature. His pin-like metal wires are a popular twist to the standardized wire armature pieces one may see in many artist studios. Kricke’s famous sculpture, “Water Forest” lies outside of the Gelsenkirchen Opera House.

Kricke steel sculpture

Kricke has created several grand pieces for famous people and locales, but among his roster of projects, his fountain art sculptures in the University of Baghdad stand out as prime examples of his undying passion for the abstract arts. Throughout his lifetime, his works have circled around continents, being displayed at various galleries such as the Galerie Rothe in Frankfurt and the Neues Museum Weimar. The Daimler Chrysler Contemporary Museum in Berlin also carries a permanent collection of his.

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Everyone is familiar with the surrealist Salvador Dali and his famous artworks, but not as many people know about his permanent exhibition in France called the Espace Dalí. The entire complex holds over three hundred original art pieces made by Dali himself. It’s located near the Place du Terte in Montmarte. Creations like the Space Elephant are housed in this museum along with several other Dalinian sculptures. Dali’s conquest for surrealism is a widespread conveyance of its curiosity through the different artistic media. He made use of everything from paperwork to painting to sculpture.

DEspace Dalí
Espace Dalí – Photography by Florian75018

Within the museum, there are many chambers for the various types of visitors. There are workshops for children to learn about art, as well as temporary exhibitions at specific halls. The two galleries that make up the museum are the Galerie Dali and the Galerie Montmarte. The later is for several contemporary artists’ exhibition usage. The Espace Dalí is a wonderful place to visit for art enthusiasts, historians, professors, students and even families. It showcases the biggest group of artworks made by the master and is open to visitors young and old.

 

Olivier Strebelle’s large and monumentally scaled sculptures have been a frequent sight for almost 60 years. His style has evolved from a previous set of organic and abstract forms to a more linear and slender type of modernism that plays with the movement of the eyes as they observe his work. Strebelle’s bronze artworks has made their way into countries like Germany, Israel, Italy, Singapore and America.

Olivier StrebelleOlivier Strebelle in his Sculpture Studio – Photography by Mark Moran

His more recent sculpture “Athletes’ Alley” has been placed on the area where the 2008 Beijing Olympics was held a few years back. This renown sculpture rose up to over sixty feet high and three hundred forty feet across. The artist made use of steel tubing and bended them into a continuous flow of contemporary shapes. From angled views, the shapes come together very nicely in an elegant assembly of sorts, but the real purpose can be seen when the piece is viewed from a specific place. It is then, that the viewer will be able to see five figures carrying the Olympic rings. The sculpture did not make it in time for the Olympic date exactly, but was a good gestural gift from Belgium to the city of Beijing. It cost about 5 million euros to create. To produce such a grand and monumental structure, a cooperative project had to be established between The Image Laboratory of the Université Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium and the Tsinghua University in China. These two universities also had to seek the expertise of C&E Ingénierie; an engineer’s consultancy specializing in metal framework, and Sofistik; a German software company.

Used as another word for public art or community art, Plop art usually refers to art that has been made for outdoor viewing. These types include the large emblematic structures outside government offices or NGO buildings. The term actually refers to art that does not match its surroundings well enough. Plop art is usually seen as a work that stands out of place when compared to the rest of the surrounding environment. In 1969, the term was coined by James Wines and was a play on the term “pop art”. Since then, people have began using it in everyday conversation to refer to these gigantic structural objects they see all around them.

Example of Plop Art

Many conservative people actually liked the term because it suggested a negative meaning. They made it look as if plop art had something to do with ugliness or strangeness, because of the word “plop” which sounds like a random dropping of an object without any care or particular attention to where it would fall. Others who enjoy plop art, have been trying to reclaim the term for a positive meaning, suggesting that “plop art” refers to public, contemporary, environental sculptures that are on display for the whole community to experience. Plop art is a type of sculpture that usually entwines itself with architecture. Some public artists now try to blend their art with existing structures like buildings and houses to make the scenery seem like part of the artwork.