Archives for posts with tag: Contemporary Sculpture

Have any of you ever encountered Constantin Brâncuşi’s Romanian pieces of modern art? Two days ago while going about my daily rounds about the worldwide artweb, I saw this picture of a remarkably stunning minimalistic sculpture. Clad in a golden hue and oriented like a vertical spire, it was an attention-grabbing artwork I just had to blog about. In the early 1920’s, I believe the original first work, “Pasărea în văzduh” was created. That very same sculpture came up at auction last 2005 and demanded the high selling price of over twenty million dollars. Today his series of sculptures under the known name “Bird in Space” is well spread out across the globe. Australia’s National Gallery, the Peggy Guggenheim Collection (Italy) and the Philadelphia Museum of Art are just some of the places that house his works of bronze and marble.

Bird in Space Modern Sculpture

What’s amazing about this series of works is how movement is visually captured in a static field of presence. Brâncuşi ‘s unique depiction of his subjects allowed for their artistic beauty to be derived from an alternate source rather than mere physical beauty or symmetry. He posed the notion of dynamic life in his body of works. To showcase this, he made people see a different side of the subjects, encompassing their existence as a visual purpose. Flight, movement, speed and distance can all be felt from one look at his majestic creations. Aside from being a colleague of the famous Marcel Duchamp (The Fountain), Brâncuşi was able to even change the outlook on fine art in the United states customs department when an late 1920’s issue regarding customs inhibited the dignity of his art pieces momentarily. A lot of people supported Brâncuşi  and he eventually won out the favor of society after an appeal. This was the very first non-representational abstract sculpture to be considered as a type of art by the government bodies involved.

Photography credited to Dennis Irrgang
Sculpture by Constantin Brâncuşi

Everyone is familiar with the surrealist Salvador Dali and his famous artworks, but not as many people know about his permanent exhibition in France called the Espace Dalí. The entire complex holds over three hundred original art pieces made by Dali himself. It’s located near the Place du Terte in Montmarte. Creations like the Space Elephant are housed in this museum along with several other Dalinian sculptures. Dali’s conquest for surrealism is a widespread conveyance of its curiosity through the different artistic media. He made use of everything from paperwork to painting to sculpture.

DEspace Dalí
Espace Dalí – Photography by Florian75018

Within the museum, there are many chambers for the various types of visitors. There are workshops for children to learn about art, as well as temporary exhibitions at specific halls. The two galleries that make up the museum are the Galerie Dali and the Galerie Montmarte. The later is for several contemporary artists’ exhibition usage. The Espace Dalí is a wonderful place to visit for art enthusiasts, historians, professors, students and even families. It showcases the biggest group of artworks made by the master and is open to visitors young and old.

 

The term Found Art was coined by the famous artist Marcel Duchamp. It referred to art whose subject composition was that of everyday objects who retained their form but were changed just a bit. These objects were among the things that were not usually considered to be classified as art or art media. Other names for Found Art are Readymade Art or Trash Art. The purpose behind the invention of found art is to challenge the notions of what constitute fine art in the first place. Just because an everyday object has a routinized or boring purpose doe not mean that it cannot be seen as art in one way or another. Every artwork made and categorized as Found Art must have an input though from the artist- such as a narration or explanation to clarify its meaning. The object becomes such art because of the artist’s direct designation of the object as art, therefore he or she must defend the idea behind it.

found art
Sculpture by Marcel Duchamp – Photography by Alfred Stieglitz

Found Art quickly spread after the time of Duchamp and made its way into popular society. Dadaism quickly sprung from it and several artists such as Man Ray and Francis Picabia used it in combination with traditional art as well. Its roots can be traced to several more artists in history such as famous surrealists like André Breton and historical geniuses like Pablo Picasso.

Earlier, we mentioned that Trash art or junk art is another name for found art. This is because many people in the modern world have attributed the two to be one and the same (though this was not true during the earlier times.) Trash art is actually a sub-genre and is usually made up of assemblage sculptor who make use of discarded materials like old computers and microwave ovens. This type of contemporary art is a more modern way of looking at the journey of Found Art into the present time.