Archives for posts with tag: Contemporary

Singapore’s recent fame with the art world isn’t just because of its status as a prestigious place to attend art auctions. The country’s own sculptors have a big impact on the global community as well. Now, let’s delve into the artistic life of Singapore’s Han Sai Por.

Han Sai Por is one of Singapore’ treasured artists. She studied at several notable art schools such as the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts, East Ham College of Art, the Wolverhampton College of Art and the Lincoln University in New Zealand. Her sculptures reflect upon the eyes as very organic and natural in shape. She plays with the theme of life and the role that natural design plays in our world. Han’s very first exhibition; Four Dimensions was held at the National Museum Gallery in the early 1990’s.

Han Sai Por SculptureSculpture by Han Sai Por – Photography by Stefano Sartor

Han founded the Sculpture Society of Singapore at the turn of the millennium, and was the very first resident sculptor of the organization’s sculpture Pavillion at Fort Canning Park. It was there that she leaned on her taste for organic sculpture even more and created masterpieces from the trunks of Tembusu trees. Despite this, she is known much more for the stone sculptures that she creates to portray natural wonders like the birth of seeds and the spirit of nature. Han is a sculptor who has achieved more in her lifetime than most artists could ever dream of. She was awarded the Cultural Medallion for Art in 1995 among several other recognitions that were given to her during the course of her career.

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Wercollier was an artist who was famous for defying the Nazi Occupation. He was born sometime in the early 1900’s at Luxembourg. As an artist, he worked mostly with bronze and marble, but also explored the sculptural properties of wood, alabaster and onyx. Today, many of his art pieces can be found internationally.

When Luxembourg was occupied by the Germans in World War II, Wercollier had a choice to make. There was an organization called the Reichskulturkammer that had been tasked to ensure that all artworks made by anyone had to be at an agreement with the “Aryan” spirit. Wercollier decided not to follow this organization and instead participated in strikes during the 1940’s. He was eventually arrested and imprisoned at the Neumünster Abbey in Luxembourg. Wercollier’s history at the abbey has not been forgotten to this very day. The location now houses many of his sculptures in a permanent collection.

Wercollier StatueSculpture by Lucien Wercollier – Photography by Claude Meisch

Later on, Wercollier was transferred to the Hinzert concentration camp in Germany. Wercollier sympathized with the victims of the Nazi oppression that were sent there and this experience led him to create many of his future works.  After being rellocated to Lublin for a while, he was later freed at the turn of the war. As a free man, Wercollier was able to pursue his artistic career yet again with more vigilance and passion. He founded the Iconomaques, along with some friends. It was a group of Luxembourg artists who had been spreading the movement of abstract art all across the nation.

Today, Wercollier’s works can be read about in the history of the city and in many international news articles as well. The government of Luxembourg gave one of his sculptors to the Kennedy Center in Washington to honor John F. Kennedy. Another of his sculptures was also sent to the Olympic Sculpture Garden in Lausanne Switzerland. Wercollier’s history as a sculptor was defined by his story and because of his unique experiences, his art was able to move thousands all across the globe. It only shows that art can be a force for change an a pioneer for good in our modern world.


Olivier Strebelle’s large and monumentally scaled sculptures have been a frequent sight for almost 60 years. His style has evolved from a previous set of organic and abstract forms to a more linear and slender type of modernism that plays with the movement of the eyes as they observe his work. Strebelle’s bronze artworks has made their way into countries like Germany, Israel, Italy, Singapore and America.

Olivier StrebelleOlivier Strebelle in his Sculpture Studio – Photography by Mark Moran

His more recent sculpture “Athletes’ Alley” has been placed on the area where the 2008 Beijing Olympics was held a few years back. This renown sculpture rose up to over sixty feet high and three hundred forty feet across. The artist made use of steel tubing and bended them into a continuous flow of contemporary shapes. From angled views, the shapes come together very nicely in an elegant assembly of sorts, but the real purpose can be seen when the piece is viewed from a specific place. It is then, that the viewer will be able to see five figures carrying the Olympic rings. The sculpture did not make it in time for the Olympic date exactly, but was a good gestural gift from Belgium to the city of Beijing. It cost about 5 million euros to create. To produce such a grand and monumental structure, a cooperative project had to be established between The Image Laboratory of the Université Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium and the Tsinghua University in China. These two universities also had to seek the expertise of C&E Ingénierie; an engineer’s consultancy specializing in metal framework, and Sofistik; a German software company.

Recently there have been a number of Chinese sculptors that have made impact on the global art community. Here, we are going to talk about one of them. His name is Zhan Wang and he is an abstract sculptor who works with the boldness of the media and likes to transform it in ways that no one has ever seen before. Some people say that Zhan takes his inspiration from the many wild experiences he has had over the years. In 2004 for example, Zhan climbed the tallest mountain in the world; Everest, and put one of his sculptures at the very top of the peak.

zhan wang's sculpture rockSculpture Rock Number 59 by Zhan Wang – Photography by Reguiieee

Zhan’s sculptures were often considered a novelty not because of their form, shape or subject, but because of the new manner that he presented these already-existing objects. He would play with positions, balance, and color to make each piece seem like it has been reinvented for the purpose of a new art experience. He calls his recent style “Floating Stones” and they can be classified as sculptures that are largely textured and rock-like in nature. The difference is, these large masses of nature are coated in chrome metals by Zhan himself. They are also known as scholar’s rocks according to the artist. He also refer to this particular set of works he started in 1995 as Artificial Jiashanshi. The mirror-like feel of his sculptures give surrealists a feel of an indeterminate form and existence. The liquid-like chrome blends with the cascades of light and reflects some of it back at the human eye to showcase the brilliance of Zhan’s master craftsmanship.

Many people say that the art of each person is completely unique, this is because what defines an individual person’s art is also what defines that individual. Upbringing, history, locations and surroundings all affect the artist in a manner that shapes his art as well as his ability to conceive ideas.

Today let’s take a look at Brazilian sculpture and where the modern era of art is taking them. Sculptors in Brazil have currently evolved beyond the Neogothic, Deco and Art Nouveau movements already and are in fine tuning with contemporary themes such as minimalism and surrealism. In 1951, the São Paulo Art Biennial was one of the ground breaking events that gave abstract sculpture the push it needed in the Brazilian community. Max Bill, a Swiss sculptor was the gold winner for the competition during that year.

Brazillian SculptureSculptures by Franz Krajcberg – Photography by Sam Emerick

Since then, abstract sculpture has grown into more modern themes in Brazil, however the people’s preference fro figurative resemblances did not vanish along with the trends of the past. They incorporated this into many of their contemporary works, even with subtle hints or meaningful symbolism plays. Pop art and Neoexpressionism were among some of the artistic movements that gave abstract sculpture its diversity in the country in 1960. These days, several Brazilian sculptors have made their way into the international art scene. Some of the popular artists include Francisco Brennarnd, Sergio de Camargo and Willys de Castro. Brazilian sculpture continues its journey to transform the local art community into an assemblage of noteworthy personalities that can teach younger generations their wide appreciation of art and design.

This sculpture is located right outside the National Air and Space Museum’s Jefferson Drive gateway. It’s a beautiful stainless steel sculpture that protrudes into the clear sky. Richard Lippold made this public artwork to stand at about a hundred feet tall. The gold-colored steel was shaped into three planes of protrusions angled creatively to disappear into a point at the 100 foot mark. There are also three multi-pronged objects at the same mark. The point seems to be penetrating this array of star-like symbols.

Ad Astra Sculpture
Sculpture by Richard Lippold Photography by Tony Lazaretti

This unique sculpture is well defined in its simple, but well-thought out composition. The artist had the purpose of making it convey the journey that man kind has undertaken. The sculpture is a symbol of our very own conquest into the previously unknown reaches of outer space. The title; Ad Astra is latin for the meaning “to the stars”. Richard Lippold was an esteemed artist and professor at several American universities, such as Hunter College at the New York City University