Archives for posts with tag: Steel Sculpture

A native of Düsseldorf, Norbert Kricke is a fine example of abstract sculpture in the non-figurist sense. Abstract sculpture can be classified into several sub-categories, but mainly fall into two types; representational and non-representational. Despite his works being frequently described as non-reresentational abstract sculpture, Kricke’s various organic forms are inspired by the subject matter of water and nature. His pin-like metal wires are a popular twist to the standardized wire armature pieces one may see in many artist studios. Kricke’s famous sculpture, “Water Forest” lies outside of the Gelsenkirchen Opera House.

Kricke steel sculpture

Kricke has created several grand pieces for famous people and locales, but among his roster of projects, his fountain art sculptures in the University of Baghdad stand out as prime examples of his undying passion for the abstract arts. Throughout his lifetime, his works have circled around continents, being displayed at various galleries such as the Galerie Rothe in Frankfurt and the Neues Museum Weimar. The Daimler Chrysler Contemporary Museum in Berlin also carries a permanent collection of his.

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Olivier Strebelle’s large and monumentally scaled sculptures have been a frequent sight for almost 60 years. His style has evolved from a previous set of organic and abstract forms to a more linear and slender type of modernism that plays with the movement of the eyes as they observe his work. Strebelle’s bronze artworks has made their way into countries like Germany, Israel, Italy, Singapore and America.

Olivier StrebelleOlivier Strebelle in his Sculpture Studio – Photography by Mark Moran

His more recent sculpture “Athletes’ Alley” has been placed on the area where the 2008 Beijing Olympics was held a few years back. This renown sculpture rose up to over sixty feet high and three hundred forty feet across. The artist made use of steel tubing and bended them into a continuous flow of contemporary shapes. From angled views, the shapes come together very nicely in an elegant assembly of sorts, but the real purpose can be seen when the piece is viewed from a specific place. It is then, that the viewer will be able to see five figures carrying the Olympic rings. The sculpture did not make it in time for the Olympic date exactly, but was a good gestural gift from Belgium to the city of Beijing. It cost about 5 million euros to create. To produce such a grand and monumental structure, a cooperative project had to be established between The Image Laboratory of the Université Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium and the Tsinghua University in China. These two universities also had to seek the expertise of C&E Ingénierie; an engineer’s consultancy specializing in metal framework, and Sofistik; a German software company.

This sculpture is located right outside the National Air and Space Museum’s Jefferson Drive gateway. It’s a beautiful stainless steel sculpture that protrudes into the clear sky. Richard Lippold made this public artwork to stand at about a hundred feet tall. The gold-colored steel was shaped into three planes of protrusions angled creatively to disappear into a point at the 100 foot mark. There are also three multi-pronged objects at the same mark. The point seems to be penetrating this array of star-like symbols.

Ad Astra Sculpture
Sculpture by Richard Lippold Photography by Tony Lazaretti

This unique sculpture is well defined in its simple, but well-thought out composition. The artist had the purpose of making it convey the journey that man kind has undertaken. The sculpture is a symbol of our very own conquest into the previously unknown reaches of outer space. The title; Ad Astra is latin for the meaning “to the stars”. Richard Lippold was an esteemed artist and professor at several American universities, such as Hunter College at the New York City University